(704) 436-9048 woodswalk@carolina.rr.com
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Reptile Programs

hands on reptile programs

Available Programs:

Reptiles "For Goodness Snakes"
Get information about this Educational Reptile Program >>

Sea Turtles "Gentle Giants of Land & Sea"
Get information about this Educational Reptile Program >>

North Carolina Snakes
Get information about this Educational Reptile Program >>

World of Snakes
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Read about other Educational Animal Science Programs >>


snake hands on programs

Reptiles “For Goodness SNAKES”

See live reptiles including snakes, turtles and a lizard

Reptiles represent one of the oldest living species on the planet having existed in many different forms for millions of years.  Participants learn about types of reptiles, characteristics, diet, eggs, hatchlings, growth habits, adaptations and conservation measures.  Find out the differences between freshwater and terrestrial turtles, alligators and crocodiles, venomous and non-venomous snakes plus many more scaly facts.  Participants unroll a real 10 ft. African Rock Python skin!

An example of hands-on artifacts in this program includes:

Alligator skulls (3 sizes), replicated crocodile skull, snake skeleton, turtle carapaces, turtle eggs, iguana eggs, snake eggs, snake shed, freshwater turtle skull, preserved snake specimens including the venomous Copperhead snake (adult and juvenile).  Confiscated items from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service include 10 ft. Rock python skin, crocodile purse, cobra boot, Nile crocodile wallet and other items.  Books and educational posters are on display.
 
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Pictured left to right: Participants see and touch a full array of reptile artifacts. A boy examines preserved reptile specimens in formaldehyde. A young child touches an Eastern Box Turtle for the first time.
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turtle reptile programs for schools

Sea Turtles “Gentle Giants of Land and Sea”

See live relatives of sea turtles including terrestrial and freshwater turtles.

Of more than 250 turtle species living today, the seven species of sea turtles pose the largest threat of becoming extinct in the near future.  Currently, all sea turtles are listed as threatened or endangered.  In this program, participants learn how to identify sea turtles and understand how they are different from other turtles.  Topics of discussion include:  identification, life cycle, anatomy, diet, nesting, hatchling emergence, defense strategies, natural predators, man-induced problems and conservation efforts.  Participants can observe a life-size image of the largest turtle in the world, the Leatherback sea turtle and touch many turtle terrific items on display.

An example of hands on artifacts in this program includes:

 Please note: Sea turtle artifacts are protected by law and licensed to authorized science institutions.  On loan from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service include 3 Loggerhead skulls, 2 Hawksbill sea turtle taxidermy, 2 Green sea turtle carapaces, preserved hatchlings of Loggerheads and Green sea turtles, lower jaw of a Green sea turtle and Green sea turtle eggshells.  Confiscated items include an Olive Ridley cowboy boot, sea turtle body lotion and Hawksbill bracelets.   Books and educational posters are on display.
 
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Pictured from left to right: Children witness the life size image of the largest turtle in the world, a Leatherback sea turtle. Boys examine the spine of a Green sea turtle carapace. Preserved sea turtle specimens are on display.
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hands on snake programs for kids

North Carolina Snakes 

See live native ratsnakes and kingsnakes     

Can you tell which native snakes are venomous and which ones are not?  What should you do if you find a snake in your yard?  In this program, participants learn to identify non-venomous snakes such native ratsnakes and kingsnakes by their patterns and how to tell them apart from venomous ones such as rattlesnakes and the common Copperhead snake.  Find out the benefits of snakes and understand their behavior, diet, habitat and anatomy.  This is important information each person should know about snakes in our area.

An example of hands-on artifacts in this program includes: 

Snake eggs, snake skeleton, herpetologist equipment, snake sheds from a variety of snakes and preserved snake specimens.  See a preserved juvenile and adult venomous Copperhead.  Books and educational posters are on display.
 
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Pictured from left to right: Girls examine preserved snake specimens, snake skeleton and snake sheds on display. This boy likes wearing a snake shed around his neck. A young girl admires her first look at snake eggs.
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reptile snake education for schools

World of Snakes

See live snakes from Africa, North America and South America

As one of the most varied vertebrates on our planet, snakes are spread across every continent except Antarctica.  Snake display an array of sizes and colors but all are immediately recognized by their long, narrow, legless shape.  Often misunderstood, this program teaches the benefits of snakes and their importance in human lives.  Topics for discussion include:  anatomy, diet, identification, feeding techniques, camouflage patterns, behaviors and information on what to do if you find a snake.  Participants unroll a confiscated 10 ft. African Rock Python snake skin.  Do you know the largest snake in the world?  Participants find out as they unroll a replicated example of the largest snake in the world that is 30 feet long!

An example of hands on artifacts in the program includes:

Herpetologist’s equipment for snake collecting, Pueblan milksnake eggs, Black milksnake eggs, Black ratsnake eggs, venomous snake skeleton, snake sheds, snake eye cap, Copperhead teeth, preserved specimens include a Copperhead snake (adult and juvenile), Desert king snake, Eastern kingsnake and Pueblan milksnake hatchlings.  Books and educational posters are on display.
 
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Pictured left to right: Snake eggs, skeletons, snake sheds and more on display for participants to touch. A child feels the muscles of a Red-tailed Boa Constrictor. Participants unroll a confiscated 10 ft. African Rock Python skin.
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To schedule a program call 704-436-9048 Email: woodswalk@carolina.rr.com